Banana Bread

Ingredients:

1/2 cup pot-margarine
2 cups all-purpose flour
3 bananas (very ripe)
1/2 sour cream or milk
1 cup sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon baking soda
1/2 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup of finely chopped weed

Cooking Instructions:

Banana BreadPreheat oven to 350 degrees.

Beat the margarine, eggs, sour cream (or milk), and sugar in a large bowl.

Add baking soda, weed, and vanilla.

Add flour slowly while beating.

When mixed, add the bananas and beat until mostly smashed.

Place in a greased loaf baking pan and bake for one hour.

Pot Brownies

Ingredients:

1/2 cup flour
3 tablespoons shortening
2 tablespoons honeyPot Brownies
1 egg (beaten)
1 tablespoon water
1/2 cup grass
pinch of salt
1/4 teaspoon baking powder
1/2 cup sugar
2 tablespoons corn syrup
1 square melted chocolate
1 teaspoon vanilla
1/2 cup chopped nuts

Cooking Instructions:

Sift flour, baking powder, and salt together.
Mix shortening, sugar, honey, syrup, and egg.
Then blend in chocolate and other ingredients, and mix well.
Spread in an 8-inch pan and bake for 20 minutes at 350 degrees.

 

Cannabutter

Ingredients:

Pot of water
Butter
1-4 oz ground cannabis flower

Cooking Instructions:

Ok, this is the way to make Cannabutter, to be used in your everyday cooking….

Bring your water to a rolling boil, then put a small amount of butter in the water. Quickly, the butter melts, and mixes in with the water because the whole mixture is at a rolling boil.

Then put the grass in and boil it. (Of course, you will need to seperate all of the seeds first so you can plant them in the nearby park.) Now all the grass is riling around with the water and butter, and get this: The cannabinoids dissolve into the butter, while most of the nasty flavours and gook dissolve into the water. You need to stir the stuff regularly. After cooking the grass like this for a while (say, half an hour), your kitchen will really smell incriminating. Strain out the spent plant matter, squeeze all the juice out of it, and put the liquid in the fridge.

A few hours later, the mixture is cool enough that the cannabutter has solidified on the surface. It looks kind of scummy, but its just enchanted butter. Scoop it out and retain it in a bowl or a jar. The grass-nasty water is thrown out.

Recipe sourced from:
http://www.norml.org.nz/postt412.html

Marijuana Tea

Ingredients:

Tea (black tea or your choice)
Marijuana (1 ground flower)

Cooking Instructions:

Like other herbs, marijuana may be made into a tea. Boil the water first and pour it over the marijuana. Let it steep for longer than you would for common black tea; approximately an hour and a half.

Add 1 tsp. of marijuana or regular butter. The effects are similar to eating it.

It is easy to make marijuana tea and can be combined with mint or any other herbal tea flavors to enhance it’s taste.

Floating Bud

Ingredients:

3 eggs

4 oz flour

2 tbs salt

5 g brown sugar

2 tbs plain sugar

14 oz finely ground cannabis flowers

Cooking Instructions:

Pre-heat oven to 350 degrees.

Mix ingredients.

Grease the pan.

Pour mixture onto pan and place in oven until lightly browned.

Cannabis Infused Tea

infused cannabis tea

infused cannabis tea

Cannabis tea can be made from many different ingredients:

  1. An infusion of dry flowers and water — typically less psychoactive because THC is not water-soluble.
  2. A mixture of cannabis infused with fat (e.g., coconut oil, butter, and/or dairy) combined with tea leaves and water to make a chai or latte-type drink.
  3. A mixture of regular tea leaves and water heated with an alcohol-based extraction (such as a tincture) added to it.

First do the decarboxylation of your herb. During the process of decarboxylation, the non-psychoactive compound THCA is converted to the compound THC, activating its medicinal and psychoactive properties. The heat applied to cannabis when smoking or vaporizing provokes decarboxylation without any extra effort on our part. When making edibles, the process naturally occurs when the cannabis is cooked with butter or oils, or when hash and kief are added to a favorite recipe and then heated on the stove.

If you choose to decarboxylate your cannabis using a heating method before adding it to the tea, remember that the optimal time and temperature for decarboxylation may vary depending on the amount of moisture in your product, how much product you use, and the heat applied.

Recipe for Cannabis Tea Latte

Makes about 4 (6 oz.) servings

Ingredients

  • 6 grams decarboxlyated fresh ground flowers or 12 grams of decarboxlyated fresh sugar/fan leaves, finely chopped.
  • 2 cups hemp milk or other full fat milk (choose a milk with at least 8 grams of fat per serving).
  • 1/8 stick of butter, softened, or ¼ cup coconut oil, melted (fat helps to extract THC).
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract.
  • Dry tea leaves + tea infuser.
  • 1 cup water.
  • 4 tablespoons honey.
  • Dash of cinnamon or other spice for each serving.

Directions

  1. Add the cannabis, hemp milk, fat of choice, and vanilla extract to a blender and mix thoroughly.
  2. Once blended, allow the mixture to sit for about 1 hour at room temperature.
  3. Add this mixture to a sauce pot, fill your metal tea infuser with your favorite tea leaf blend, add water, and stir.
  4. Cover and simmer over med-low heat for 15-20 minutes, reducing heat if the mixture starts to boil.
  5. Remove from heat (strain the pulp).
  6. Pour into your favorite mug, add 1 tablespoon of honey, and top with a dash of cinnamon.

Your cannabis tea latte is ready to serve!

Science of Cannabis

In this episode Gil and the Weedmaps TV team attend the 1st Annual Realm of Caring Fundraiser, in Los Angeles, CA to speak with Dr. Bonni Goldstein, on the science of cannabis and parents of children who are finding help through the use of CBD medicine.

Realm of Caring:
http://theroc.us

Canna-Centers:
http://www.canna-centers.com

 

10 Steps to Germinate Marijuana Seeds

Home Grown Germination Method:

1 Paper napkin

Cannabis seeds

1 Cup distilled water

Spray bottle

2 Small plates

1 Large plastic bag

10 Step Guide to Germinating Hemp Seeds

1. Pour the distilled water in the cup.

2. Drop in the cannabis seeds into the distilled water.

3. Place the Cup in a dark cool spot.

4. Wait 24 hours have passed, then have a look at the seeds. Seeds should be on the bottom of the cup. If seeds are still floating, stir a little and see if they sink down. If not, put the cup back and check again every 6 hours until they have submerged. If the seed already germinated and the taproot is out, plant it.

5. Drain the water from the cup. Open the napkin up and place on the plate, then place the cannabis seed on top and cover with remaining napkin.

6. Fill the spray bottle with distilled water and spray the napkin until damp.

7. Cover the plate with the other plate, so that the damp napkin is in between the plates

8. Put the plates inside the plastic bag, but don’t close tight.

9. Every 8 hours open the bag and check if the taproot has come out or the napkin has dried. Once the taproot has come out, plant the seedling in potting soil.

10. If the napkin is dried, respray with distilled water until the napkin is damp.

Hemp seeds in a small bowl with teaspoon

Hemp seeds in a small bowl with teaspoon (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Why Marijuana Should be Legal

Many Americans feel that Marijuana is helping fund the war on terror, but making a war on drugs and keeping Marijuana illegal has not stopped millions of Americans from smoking pot everyday. So what is the answer?

First, why is Cannabis illegal? In the 1930’s William Randolph Hearst, who had significant financial interests in the timber industry testified to congress on the evils of marijuana, saying things like it make people insane and commit acts of cannibalism? at this time very few even knew what it was and to stop people from going insane Congress decided to make it illegal.

The truth is many paper manufacturers were thinking of changing from using trees to make paper to using hemp because it was cheaper and easier to grow and better for the environment, and Hearst stood to loose millions so he used his influence and testimony to help get marijuana banned in the USA.

So now that we know why it was made illegal, we can realize that not only would making it legal in the United States stop terrorist from smuggling it into the USA, but would give us another option to cutting down of millions of trees every year for paper products that can be made better from hemp.

Hemp Products

Hemp has thousands of uses that we are unable to exploit because of its illegal status.

During WWII hemp was used for the rigging on parachutes as well as rope and material for uniforms.

Nowadays Marijuana can be used to relieve pain and some of the effect of cancer treatments and old age.

It has been proven to slow down the spreading of Alzheimer’s, relieve the pressure behind the eyes from glaucoma. It also helps relieve migraine headaches and the side effect of cancer treatment.

But until the United States realizes how much money can be made from legalizing it, it will remain illegal.

This is much like the situation with online casinos in the USA. America was sending billions of dollars out of the country and the government needed to do something to keep the money here, so they banned <a href=”http://www.online-casinos-789.com”>Online Casino</a> and just like online casinos and online gambling I believe one day the government will learn to take advantage of these things instead of just banning them.

Eventually the USA will realize that the best way to stop the flow of money out of the country is not to ban marijuana or online casinos, but to enter the market and compete.

If the USA did what Amsterdam has done the government would make not only billions in Taxes from the sales of Marijuana, but the economy would boom from all the tourism that it would bring in from all over the world.

The truth of the matter is that legalization is inevitable. The attitude of people has changed so drastically over the last 30 years, that eventually when the younger generations start to take over marijuana will eventually become legal because they understand the truth, and that is banning something only makes the market for it stronger.

Hemp and Marijuana Timeline

Hemp and Marijuana – ELIMINATING THE CONFUSION

Hemp/industrial hemp and marijuana are two distinct varieties of the same plant species. Hemp is a fiber crop. Marijuana is a drug crop. However, these definitions have become confused in the last 60 years. Recently, a movement has begun to distinguish the terms again. It is important to understand the history of usage of these terms in order to eliminate the confusion.

Hemp and Marijuana Myths and Realities

1600-1930s Hemp’s Long History in North America

The word hemp has been in the English language for over 800 years. The word marijuana is only 100 years old.
From the first settling of North America until the 1930s, hemp was the most common term for Cannabis sativa fiber crops. Marijuana was never used to describe hemp fiber crops, which were grown for canvas, rope, fuel oil, and paper. Hemp fiber crops were historically low THC and completely non-psychoactive.

1930s-1940s Marijuana tax Act confuses Hemp and Marijuana

In the 1930s, the psychoactive (high-THC) variety of cannabis sativa, imported from Mexico, became common in the southern U.S. It was called marijuana, a word popularized through the Reefer Madness campaign, to distinguish it from the hemp fiber crops (which no one ever smoked).
In 1937, the passage of the Marijuana tax Act hopelessly confused the terms hemp and marijuana. For the first time, Congress defined these distinct varieties of Cannabis sativa as being the same. What had been commonly known as hemp was now marijuana.
1950s Hemp Crops Become Extinct
In 1957, the last hemp fiber crop was harvested in the U.S. Because low-THC Cannabis sativa fiber crops were now extinct, the word hemp dropped out of use and was forgotten.

1960s Marijuana Legalization Movement Begins

In the 1960s, the psychoactive variety of cannabis sativa (marijuana) became popular among the counter-culture. The movement to legalize marijuana in the 1960s and 1970s did not use the term ìhempî to describe marijuana.

1985 Hemp Marijuana Movement Begins

In 1985, the word hemp re-surfaced in the book The Emperor Wears No Clothes by Jack Herer. This book uncovered information that had been lost for almost 40 years about ìhempísî historical uses as a fiber crop. The book also touted hemp as a solution to modern environmental problems.

Because The Emperor was targeted at a marijuana movement and since it was not widely known that low-THC varieties of hemp existed in Europe and Asia, it was believed that marijuana must be legalized to allow industrial uses of hemp. And because it was the environmentalists and the counter-culture that began promoting hemp as an alternative fiber crop, they were not taken seriously.

1989 European Farmers Grow Hemp

In Europe, some countries (like France and Spain) had never stopped producing hemp. In 1989, the European Economic Community developed rules to govern hemp production that applied to all its member countries. The EEC defined registered seed varieties for low THC hemp and methods for testing hemp for THC content.

1993-1994 England and Canada Grow Hemp

In 1993, England officially recognized the difference between hemp and marijuana, to make its farmers competitive in the EEC. In 1994, Canada, seeing competition from Europe, allowed hemp production.

1994 Kentucky Appoints Hemp Task Force

In November of 1994, the Governor of Kentucky, seeing competition from Canada and Europe, appointed a Task Force to study the commercial possibilities of hemp in his state.

1994-1995 Industrial Hemp Movement Begins in U.S.

For the first time, farmers, manufacturers, processors, and agricultural researchers in North America began to take a serious look at hemp as an agricultural crop and alternative fiber. As well, the hemp environmentalists within the marijuana movement see that registered seed varieties exist to distinguish hemp from marijuana.

This diverse coalition begins using the word industrial hemp (or simply hemp) to refer exclusively to low-THC non-psychoactive varieties of Cannabis sativa. The goal of the industrial hemp movement is to allow legitimate production of hemp fiber crops and to explore the environmental benefits of ìhempî as an alternative fiber, pulp, and oil source.

Jan. 1995 Colorado Senator Introduces Hemp Legislation

In January 1995, Senator Lloyd Casey (D-Northglenn), made Colorado the first state to attempt to define industrial hemp as distinct form marijuana when he introduced the Hemp Production Act. Unfortunately, this bill was killed in Committee due to objections from the federal Drug Enforcement Administration.

Oct. 1995 North American Industrial Hemp Council Formed

In October 1995, the steering committee of the North American Industrial Hemp Council made industrial hemp an entirely distinct issue, separate from the legalization of marijuana.

Jan. 1996 Colorado and Vermont Introduce Hemp Legislation

Legislators in two states introduced industrial hemp legislation, Sen. Lloyd Casey (D) from Colorado and Rep. Fred Maslack (R) from Vermont.

Jan. 1996 Support for Hemp Grows

A strong coalition of diverse organizations now supports Industrial hemp, including:

American Farm Bureau federation (4.6 million member)
Colorado Farm Bureau
Colorado Department of Agriculture
Colorado State Grange
Kentucky Farm Bureau
Kentucky Hemp Growers Cooperative
Wisconsin Agribusiness Council
Wisconsin Department of Agriculture
International Paper Company
Bolton Emerson Americas
Colorado Environmental Coalition
Oregon Natural Resources Council
HIA (Hemp Industries Association)
North American Industrial Hemp Council

Most, if not all of these groups have specifically stated that they are opposed to the legalization of marijuana. They realize the difference between hemp/industrial hemp and marijuana and that hemp/industrial hemp can be grown safely without affecting marijuana laws, production, or use.

Today: Making Progress…

25 of 53 state hemp-related bills introduced since 1995 have passed and overall, 14 states have successfully passed hemp-related legislation. In 2002, hemp bills have been introduced in seven states: Arizona, California, Hawaii, New Mexico, Vermont, Wisconsin and West Virginia. The CA, HI and WV bills have passed, the NM and VT bills have died in committee, and the AZ and WI bills have been held until 2003.